Tag Archives: Minimum Wage

Buckle Up for 2018: New Overtime Regulations Manufacturing Confusion

Readers of this blog may recognize I have spilled a good deal of ink over the last two years discussing the impact of the Obama Administration’s efforts to increase the minimum salary for  certain employees to be considered exempt from minimum wage and overtime requirements.  See “Breaking News: Manufacturers Breathe Relief as Court Strikes Down … Continue Reading

New York City’s Salary History Ban Takes Effect October 31

Effective October 31, 2017, New York City becomes another jurisdiction making it unlawful for manufacturers and other employers to ask most job applicants for information about their prior or current salary, compensation or benefits.  Adopted by the City Council earlier this year, the new law seeks to eliminate wage inequality experienced by women and minorities … Continue Reading

Breaking News: Manufacturers Breathe Relief as Court Strikes Down DOL Overtime Rule

 The United States District Court for the District of Texas issued a broad decision today invalidating the U.S. Department of Labor’s attempt to amend the so-called “White Collar” Exemption by doubling the minimum salary paid to such individuals.  Read the decision here. I have previously posted about the DOL Overtime Rule.  See “Time Running Out … Continue Reading

The DOL Seeks to Change the Tide

While local state and city governments have been working to expand the scope of workplace protections, the Federal government has begun “undoing” some of the aggressive advancements of the Obama Administration. On June 7, the Department of Labor (DOL) announced in a brief statement that it was withdrawing two significant guidance documents – one with … Continue Reading

States (and Cities) Rush In Where Congress Fears to Tread

Some manufacturers may interpret the “Epic Fail” of Congress to repeal the Affordable Care Act as a sign of stability in the labor and employment landscape.  After all, one thing which the new Administration and Congressional Republicans had in common was their seven-year pledge to repeal “Obamacare.”  When compared to the divergent views on other … Continue Reading

Manufacturing Law Predictions for 2017:  Labor and Employment

As has been our tradition, January is the time to predict the big developments in the coming year which will impact on manufacturers.  Notwithstanding my “Lawyer’s Shrug,” here is my take on 2017. Minimum Wages.  Even though President Trump ran on a populist platform to raise wages for American Workers, I believe it unlikely Congress … Continue Reading

The 2017 “Manufacturers’ Lawyer’s Shrug”

I am a really big fan of the NPR radio show, “Car Talk,” where two Boston auto mechanics took callers’ questions and tried to answer them.  Since the November 8 election, I have freely adapted one of their signature phrases – I call it the “Manufacturers’ Lawyers’ Shrug.”  Basically, when I attend any event and … Continue Reading

Time Running Out for Compliance with New DOL Overtime Regulation

As noted in this space in May, effective December 1, employees earning less than $47,476 per year may no longer be treated as exempt from overtime under the federal Fair Labor Standards Act.  See “New Wage and Hour Requirements for Certain Employees of Manufacturers.”  Those manufacturers which have not yet addressed the issue have a … Continue Reading

New Wage and Hour Requirements for Certain Employees of Manufacturers

In May, the U.S. Department of Labor (“DOL”) published its amended regulation regarding the so-called “White Collar” exemption from the Fair Labor Standards Act (“FLSA”).  As a result, manufacturers may either have to boost the wages of some employees or radically change the manner in which those employees are compensated. Under the FLSA, employees must … Continue Reading

Raising Manufacturing Employees’ Wages? Consider the Unintended Consequences

The political discourse focusing on the wage disparity between the rich and the poor has led to efforts to raise the minimum wage for American workers.  Today, more than half the states have minimum wages above the Federal minimum wage, and effective July 1, 2015, the District of Columbia crossed the $10 per hour threshold … Continue Reading
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