Below in an excerpt from an article authored by Robinson+Cole Labor and Employment Group lawyers Alisha N. SullivanAbby M. Warren and Emily A. Zaklukiewicz that was published in Industry Week on July 21, 2021.

For many months, manufacturers have been navigating issues related to the COVID-19 vaccine and its impact on the workplace.

This week, we continue our 2021 outlook series with a focus on labor and employment. With the new Presidential administration this year, we anticipate a number of changes in labor and employment laws on the federal level. The following are a few of the issues that may impact manufacturers in 2021.

Federal Government Involvement in

Regular readers of this blog know that I have been cautioning manufacturers about what I expect will become a significant “snap back” in federal workplace regulations because of Joe Biden’s election as president.  It may be time to consider the changes which may lay ahead.

During his first term, President Biden will be able to

This week we are pleased to have a guest post from Jennifer L. Shanley, a member of Robinson+Cole’s Immigration Group. Her preparation of temporary and permanent immigration petitions allow manufacturing, chemical, pharmaceutical, and biotechnology companies, including some Fortune 100 companies, to retain key business people, scientists, researchers, and other professionals.

The National Association of Manufacturers (NAM), along with several prominent business organizations, filed a lawsuit in federal court to stop the Department of Homeland Security’s (DHS) regulations governing the H-1B nonimmigrant visa program that would disrupt manufacturers’ ability to hire and retain critical high-skilled talent.

By way of background DHS announced an interim final rule that revises the definition of H-1B specialty occupation to include the requirement of a specific relationship between the required degree field(s) and the duties of the offered position. It also restricts eligibility for the program in several additional ways, including requiring employers to provide contracts, work orders, itineraries or similar evidence to prove employer-employee relationship when sending H-1B workers to third party worksites, ultimately providing the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) with the ultimate discretion on who meets the definition of employer and employee. The other rule issued by the Department of Labor increased the wage floor companies are required to pay employees to historically high rates.
Continue Reading Manufacturers Fighting Disruptive Immigration Reform

Effective September 30, the New York State Paid Sick Leave Law (NYSPSL Law) and amendments to the New York City Paid Safe and Sick Leave Law (NYCPSL Law) became effective requiring implementation of new leave accrual, record-keeping and reporting obligations.  Manufacturers with operations in New York State or New York City may need to

On Friday, September 11, the U.S. DOL issued revised regulations under the Families First Coronavirus Response Act (“FFCRA”).  Responding to a Federal Court’s August 4 decision invalidating four provisions in the prior regulations (see Post here), the Revised Regulations become effective September 16 and will sunset on December 31, 2020.

Adopted with lightning speed in

This week we are pleased to have a guest post from Natale V. Di Natale. Attorney Di Natale is a member of Robinson+Cole’s Labor, Employment, Benefits, and Immigration Team.

Manufacturers are increasingly aware that an inclusive workplace is synonymous with one that does not tolerate abusive conduct, personal attacks or any form of harassment,

This week we are pleased to have a guest post from Edward Heath and Dan Brody. Attorneys Heath and Brody are members of Robinson+Cole’s Government Enforcement and White-Collar Defense Team.

McDonald’s Corporation, a Fortune 500 company and one of the world’s largest fast-food chains, was recently reminded of the value of two basic internal controls: maintaining an anonymous reporting system and conducting an internal investigation based upon information received through that system. Those two measures, which can be adopted by any manufacturing company of any size, may have saved the Golden Arches over $40 million.

Last November, McDonald’s terminated its CEO, Stephen Easterbrook, for having a consensual relationship with an employee, deeming it conduct that demonstrated poor judgment. During the termination process, Easterbrook informed the company’s Board that the relationship had been the only one of its kind. Based on that representation, McDonald’s agreed to pay Easterbrook a severance package valued at about $42 million.
Continue Reading Internal Investigation Leads to Potential $40 Million Clawback Effort

A United States federal judge in Manhattan struck down four regulations issued by the United States Department of Labor (“DOL”) limiting paid leave entitlements under the Families First Coronavirus Response Act.  In his August 3, 2020 decision, Judge J. Paul Oetken found the DOL exceeded its authority (a) by determining that employees were not entitled