This week’s post was co-authored by Robinson+Cole Insurance + Reinsurance Group lawyer Denis J. O’Malley.

When a domestic company starts a relationship with an international partner, choosing the jurisdiction in which any dispute must be litigated in the event of a contract breach may not be top of mind. But a recent decision by the Connecticut Supreme Court illustrates the vital importance of including a forum selection clause in any contract with a foreign company in order to avoid the risk of having to litigate overseas.
Continue Reading Manufacturing Alert: New Court Decision Underscores Importance of Forum Selection Clauses in Contracts

This post is the result of a collaboration between the manufacturing law practices of U.S. based law firm, Robinson & Cole LLP, and U.K. law firm, Brabners LLP. The article was drafted by R+C lawyers, Kevin Daly and Jeff White and Brabners lawyers, Roy Barry and Oliver Andrews.  

The trade relationship between the U.S. and UK is an economically and historically important one for both nations. While the two nations recommitted to their longstanding alliance at the recent G7 summit, a number of trade-related disputes remain pending. Some recent tariff easing suggests that the two countries are seeking to resolve these issues, and further changes to the tariff environment could be coming.
Continue Reading Small Steps on Big Issues: Recent Developments in the U.S.-UK Trade Relationship

This week we are pleased to have a guest post from Edward Heath and Kevin Daly. Attorneys Heath and Daly are members of Robinson+Cole’s Manufacturing Industry Team and regularly counsel clients on export control and anti-corruption compliance.

Earlier this month, it was announced that Honeywell International, Inc. (Honeywell) had entered into a $13 million

This week we are pleased to have a guest post from Edward Heath and Kevin Daly. Attorneys Heath and Daly are members of Robinson+Cole’s Manufacturing Industry Team and regularly counsel clients on trade compliance, anti-corruption compliance, and other corporate compliance issues.

Proposition 65 is the California law that requires warning labels on products sold to California customers that potentially expose users to certain chemicals which may cause a risk of cancer or reproductive harm. The state maintains  a list of approximately 900 chemicals that fall within Prop 65, and the statute provides detailed guidance on what the warning label must contain.  Because of the steep penalties that can be imposed under Prop 65 litigation, compliance with the warning requirements is vital for any company selling products into California. Recently, the California Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment (OEHHA) has proposed amendments to the format requirements for Proposition 65 warnings that will require companies to re-assess the sufficiency of their current warnings.

Prop 65 provides two forms of “safe harbor” warnings. If a warning label conforms to the statutory specifics, it is deemed to shield the company from liability.
Continue Reading California Regulators Propose New Regulations to Limit Use of “Short Form” Proposition 65 Warnings

2021 Corporate Compliance & Litigation Outlook for Manufacturers

In late 2012, we created the Manufacturing Law Blog with the goal of providing our manufacturing clients with a holistic approach to the unique issues facing manufacturers that operate globally. Starting in 2016, we made sure our first three posts of the year are dedicated to providing

This week we are pleased to have a guest post from Edward Heath and Kevin Daly. Attorneys Heath and Daly are members of Robinson+Cole’s Manufacturing Industry Team and regularly counsel clients on trade compliance, anti-corruption compliance, and other corporate compliance issues.

It would be a mistake to think that the $2.9 billion settlement Goldman Sachs Group Inc. has agreed to pay in order to resolve allegations of widespread bribes to government officials in Malaysia and the United Arab Emirates has no relevance to those in the manufacturing industry. Although the settlement did involve a financial services firm, the underlying facts highlight important considerations for manufacturers with respect to the U.S. Foreign Corrupt Practices Act (FCPA).

The FCPA is the federal law that prohibits U.S. companies from paying, offering, or promising anything of value to a foreign government official in order to obtain or retain business opportunities. The DOJ and SEC share enforcement authority for the FCPA, and it is a major enforcement priority for both agencies. Total FCPA recoveries for the U.S. government total in the hundreds of millions of dollars annually, and in some years exceed $1 billion. The Goldman Sachs settlement is the largest FCPA settlement ever.
Continue Reading Historic $2.9 Billion Anti-Bribery Settlement Has Important Takeaways for Manufacturers

Below in an excerpt from an article authored by Robinson+Cole Manufacturing Industry team lawyers Edward J. Heath and Kevin Daly with Sasha Glassman, assistant general counsel for global materials manufacturing company Rogers Corporation, that was published on ACCDocket.com.

On June 1, 2020, the Criminal Division of the United States Department of Justice (DOJ) issued a

This week, we are pleased to have a guest post from Kevin Daly.  Attorney Daly is a member of the firm’s Manufacturing Industry Group and also its Trade Compliance Team.

The Foreign Corrupt Practices Act (“FCPA”) prohibits paying or offering bribes to foreign officials to obtain business advantage. In some instances, the paying or offering of bribes prohibited by the FCPA may involve multiple electronic communications sent over time. A federal court in New Jersey recently considered the novel issue of whether multiple communications in furtherance of a single bribe can be charged as multiple offenses under the FCPA.
Continue Reading DOJ’s Latest FCPA Pressure Tactic: Charging Multiple Violations for Single Alleged Payment Scheme

This week we are pleased to have a guest post from Edward Heath and Kevin Daly. Attorneys Heath and Daly are members of Robinson+Cole’s Manufacturing Industry Team and regularly counsel clients on trade compliance, anti-corruption compliance, and other corporate compliance issues.

 Last week, a jury found a former executive of a French multinational company guilty of violating the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act, money laundering, and conspiracy in connection with alleged bribery in Indonesia. The case is a significant test of the geographic reach of the FCPA because the defendant was a foreign national who was employed by a foreign corporation and never entered U.S. territory during the course of his employment, but he was convicted on the theory that his actions were taken as an agent for his employer’s U.S. subsidiary.
Continue Reading Conviction of Foreign Employee Reinforces Broad Geographic Reach of FCPA