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As an attorney in Robinson+Cole’s Labor, Employment, Benefits + Immigration Group, I represent manufacturers in all areas of labor and employment law.  This includes discharge and discrimination issues, workplace investigations, affirmative action compliance, employee discipline, wage and hour issues, disability and reasonable accommodation, family and medical leave, unemployment, training, and defense in federal and state court and before administrative agencies. My full firm bio can be accessed here.

I represent manufacturers in the aerospace, consumer goods, machinery and other industries, which involves identifying practical, cost-effective and realistic solutions that prioritize and solidly execute the client’s objectives.  Manufacturers face unique challenges stemming from compliance with ever-changing industry regulations, including those impacting federal contractors.  Early in my career, I toured a client’s facility facing union-related struggles and realized that only through observing the workplace on the ground level can an attorney successfully understand and represent businesses.  As an employment attorney, I work alongside clients as a true partner to further their key personnel and human resources goals, including efficient and safe operations, recruitment and retention of talent, diversity and inclusion, among other issues. Whether advising on a leadership transition or on compliance with wage payment laws, the aim is always the same – to solve problems so clients can focus their attention on doing what they do best - manufacturing.

While the pandemic may be behind us, many employees in manufacturing workplaces who worked on the front lines during the last few years, may be having difficulty remaining engaged at work and satisfied with their job. Whether it is called the “employee experience,” “employee satisfaction,” or “employee engagement” – this concept generally means the amount

In today’s world, employees spend increasingly more time at work, including in the manufacturing industry where jobs are generally not remote.  This means that employees may have close working and personal relationships with each other, such as dating and romantic relationships as well as friendships.  Such relationships, between peers, employees and supervisors, or even employees

We continue our annual tradition of covering legal trends and outlook for this year, focusing this week on employment and labor.  Following several years of pandemic-focused legislation, we are now seeing a significant uptick in new employment legislation and emerging work-related trends across the country.  The following are a few of the issues and trends

This week we are pleased to have a guest post by Robinson+Cole Labor and Employment Group lawyer Sapna Jain.

As an update to our October 12, 2022 post regarding the deadline for federal contractors and first-tier subcontractors to object to disclosure of their Type 2 Consolidated EEO-1 reports from 2016 to 2020, the Office

‘Tis especially the season this year for company holiday parties.  Manufacturers may have avoided hosting large group gatherings over the last few years, including parties, and may be seeking ways to engage workers and increase morale in the workplace at this time of year; to that end, hosting holiday or festive lunches, parties, and gatherings

This week’s post was co-authored by Robinson+Cole Labor and Employment Group lawyer Kayla N. West.

New York City’s wage disclosure law is set to take effect on November 1, 2022.  New York City is one of several state and local jurisdictions in the United States that have passed such laws recently.  In fact, New

This week we are pleased to have a guest post by Robinson+Cole Labor and Employment Group lawyer Sapna Jain.

In 2019, the Office of Federal Contract Compliance Programs (OFCCP) received an unprecedented Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) request from an investigative reporter (which was later amended), requesting Type 2 Consolidated EEO-1 reports from 2016

As most federal contractors are likely aware, this year marked the first year when covered entities were required to certify compliance with their annual affirmative action plan requirement using the new Contractor Portal of the Office of Federal Contract Compliance Programs (OFCCP). Federal contractors (and subcontractors) that are subject to such requirements now must certify

This week’s post was co-authored by Robinson+Cole Labor and Employment Group lawyer Emily A. Zaklukiewicz.

Over the last two years, employers have followed the evolving laws and guidance issued by federal, state, and local governments and public health authorities. On July 12, 2022, the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) made several noteworthy revisions to