Tag Archives: employment policies

Legal Pot = Storm Clouds for Manufacturers

New York City’s recent ban on pre-employment marijuana testing, coupled with recent decisions in New Jersey and Connecticut, could give manufacturers cause for concern.  Effective May 20, 2020, New York City employers will no longer be allowed to require pre-employment marijuana testing for most jobs, testing which historically has been a routine part of the … Continue Reading

U.S. Government Agencies’ Fast Track Changes to Legal Standards (Part 1)

With the Trump Administration now in its 27th month (half-way through the first term), Federal agencies seem to be picking up the pace of fundamentally altering the legal landscape in which manufacturers operate.  Keeping up with these changes can be a full time job. In this blog post, I will highlight some of the more … Continue Reading

New DOL Overtime Rule Impacts Manufacturers

The United States Department of Labor finally published its proposed regulation raising the minimum salary to be paid under the “white collar” exceptions to the Fair Labor Standards Act.  To refresh your recollection, virtually every worker must be paid at least minimum wage (currently $7.25 per hour under federal law, with many states having a … Continue Reading

Thought The Government was Closed? The Manufacturers’ Smorgasbord!

This week’s post is somewhat breathless because so much happened or is about to happen.  You may have thought the government has been closed for the past 35 days. But just like great magicians who get you to watch their right hand while their left hand is going about the business of the trick, the … Continue Reading

Time for 2019 Manufacturing Law Predictions: Drum Roll Please!

When it comes to 2019 employment and labor developments for manufacturers, I predict …. much more of the same. The election of President Trump and a Republican controlled House and Senate in November 2016 brought a roll-back back from the aggressive enforcement policies of the Obama administration.  Simply speaking, the Federal Government has limited or … Continue Reading

Is Your Manufacturer Handicap Accessible? 

Before answering that question, manufacturers should ask whether the they host a website where individuals can access information about products and services, view demonstrations, submit requests for price quotes or apply for a job.  If so, then the website may not be handicap accessible. Title III of Americans with Disabilities Act (“ADA”) requires goods, services, … Continue Reading

A Tale of Two Trends

  James Madison groupies rejoice!  All others can share my confusion. Called the “Father of the Constitution,” scholars credit Mr. Madison for his significant role in the fundamental design of the United States Constitution, where power was distributed between the states and the federal government, and power within the federal government was distributed among three … Continue Reading

NLRB General Counsel Rolls Back Aggressive Anti-Manufacturer Handbook Rules

National Labor Relations Board General Counsel Peter Robb issued a June 6 memorandum outlining his views on the legality or illegality of handbook rules in light of recent Trump NLRB decisions.  That guidance, which can be found here, gives an overview of Robb’s interpretation of the law. Robb’s guidance represents a radical shift away from … Continue Reading

Expanding Limits on Applicant Salary History Questions

Manufacturers in Alaska, Arizona, California, Connecticut, Hawaii and Vermont face new limits on the use of an employee’s salary history. The state legislatures in Connecticut and Vermont have both adopted laws banning manufacturers from asking about an applicant’s prior salary.  Those laws are expected to be signed by the Governors of those states and will … Continue Reading

N.L.R.B. “Joint” Disarray – Why That Matters to Manufacturers

Winston Churchill allegedly once said, “lovers of sausage and public policy should not watch either be made.”  Recent events at the National Labor Relations Board call that apt quote to mind. In its zeal to overturn Obama-era precedent, the Trump N.L.R.B. seems to have stepped right into it – creating confusion and uncertainty for manufacturers … Continue Reading

Government Initiatives in Response to Wave of Harassment Allegations Challenge Manufacturers

Two recent developments, generated from the tidal forces of the #MeToo movement should get manufacturers’ attention. On December 22, 2017, Congress adopted a comprehensive tax reform law.  Included in the statute is an amended Section 162(q).  That provision states that manufacturers may no longer deduct from federal income tax “(1) any settlement or payment related … Continue Reading

2018 Employment Law Predictions for Manufacturers

As has been our tradition, January is the time to predict the big developments in the coming year that will impact manufacturers.  In January 2017, notwithstanding my “Lawyer’s Shrug,” I predicted Congress was unlikely to raise the minimum wage, but states and cities would attempt to do so; the National Labor Relations Board would turn … Continue Reading

The Trump N.L.R.B. Gift Giving Season

Acting just days before the term of Chairman Phillip Miscimarra ended on December 16, the National Labor Relations Board issued four decisions overturning landmark cases that expanded employee and labor union protections.  In a single week, the NLRB returns to pre-Obama-Board standards and upends the apple cart.  Each case was decided on a strict, party-line … Continue Reading

New York Paid Family Leave Obligations for Manufacturers

Effective January 1, 2018, employees of manufacturers working in New York State may be eligible for paid family leave.  The NY Paid Family Leave Law (“PFLL”) is both broader than and more narrow than the federal Family and Medical Leave Act.  The PFLL applies to all employees employed by private manufacturers and working in New … Continue Reading

Buckle Up for 2018: New Overtime Regulations Manufacturing Confusion

Readers of this blog may recognize I have spilled a good deal of ink over the last two years discussing the impact of the Obama Administration’s efforts to increase the minimum salary for  certain employees to be considered exempt from minimum wage and overtime requirements.  See “Breaking News: Manufacturers Breathe Relief as Court Strikes Down … Continue Reading

New York City’s Salary History Ban Takes Effect October 31

Effective October 31, 2017, New York City becomes another jurisdiction making it unlawful for manufacturers and other employers to ask most job applicants for information about their prior or current salary, compensation or benefits.  Adopted by the City Council earlier this year, the new law seeks to eliminate wage inequality experienced by women and minorities … Continue Reading

No “Summer Slow-Down” for Manufacturers – Regulatory Changes Continue

  Readers of this space may recall my recent posts highlighting court and legislative changes to employment laws, regulations and policies affecting manufacturers.  See e.g. “‘Manufacturing’ Law: Courts Also Move to Fill the Void,” “INTERESTING UPDATE: ‘Manufacturing’ Law: Courts Join the States to Fill the Void,” and “The DOL Seeks to Change the Tide.”  While … Continue Reading

INTERESTING UPDATE: “Manufacturing” Law: Courts Join the States to Fill the Void

In a May 16 Blog Post, I reviewed several cases dealing with the question of whether Title VII’s ban on discrimination “because of . . . sex” included a ban on discrimination “because of sexual preferences.”  I summarized three recent decisions by the United States Courts of Appeal – the Eleventh Circuit holding Title VII … Continue Reading

“Manufacturing” Law: Courts Also Move to Fill the Void

Last month, I wrote that in the absence of significant Congressional action on the labor and employment front, states and cities are increasingly willing to take steps to improve employment protections.  Some courts appear willing to join in – challenging longstanding precedent and finding protections and safeguards not previously recognized. Four separate decisions in the … Continue Reading

Surpassing Even My Expectations, Predictions Come True

Last month, in my “Manufacturing Law Predictions for 2017: Labor and Employment” posting, I wrote:  “Expect at least some high-profile workplace ‘raids’ to round up undocumented workers and substantial fines on the employers which have hired them.”  On Monday, the Department of Homeland Security announced that it had concluded the round-up of 680 undocumented workers … Continue Reading

The 2017 “Manufacturers’ Lawyer’s Shrug”

I am a really big fan of the NPR radio show, “Car Talk,” where two Boston auto mechanics took callers’ questions and tried to answer them.  Since the November 8 election, I have freely adapted one of their signature phrases – I call it the “Manufacturers’ Lawyers’ Shrug.”  Basically, when I attend any event and … Continue Reading

Time Running Out for Compliance with New DOL Overtime Regulation

As noted in this space in May, effective December 1, employees earning less than $47,476 per year may no longer be treated as exempt from overtime under the federal Fair Labor Standards Act.  See “New Wage and Hour Requirements for Certain Employees of Manufacturers.”  Those manufacturers which have not yet addressed the issue have a … Continue Reading

Regulatory and Legislative Changes: No Summer Holiday Break

While you may have thought that the major party conventions and Olympic Games in Rio would have resulted in a break from significant legislative and regulatory changes, that simply does not seem to be the case.  Recent changes affecting manufacturers include the following: The U.S. Department of Labor to increase civil penalties for ERISA violations.  … Continue Reading
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