Discrimination/Harassment

This week’s post is somewhat breathless because so much happened or is about to happen.  You may have thought the government has been closed for the past 35 days. But just like great magicians who get you to watch their right hand while their left hand is going about the business of the trick, the

When it comes to 2019 employment and labor developments for manufacturers, I predict ….

much more of the same.

The election of President Trump and a Republican controlled House and Senate in November 2016 brought a roll-back back from the aggressive enforcement policies of the Obama administration.  Simply speaking, the Federal Government has limited or

Before ringing in the New Year, manufacturers bidding on competitive New York State contracts should keep in mind that after January 1, 2019, entities submitting bids must certify that they have adopted a sexual harassment policy that meets New York State’s mandated minimum standards, and provide annual training for all employees, including those working outside

Before answering that question, manufacturers should ask whether the they host a website where individuals can access information about products and services, view demonstrations, submit requests for price quotes or apply for a job.  If so, then the website may not be handicap accessible.

Title III of Americans with Disabilities Act (“ADA”) requires goods, services,

Last month, I posted about New York State’s recently enacted law mandating all New York State employers adopt Sexual Harassment Policies and train all employees annually.  See Time to Catch the “Train” – The New York Gender-Based Harassment Train.”  The Department of Labor published for public comment its August 23, 2018 draft sexual

National Labor Relations Board General Counsel Peter Robb issued a June 6 memorandum outlining his views on the legality or illegality of handbook rules in light of recent Trump NLRB decisions.  That guidance, which can be found here, gives an overview of Robb’s interpretation of the law.

Robb’s guidance represents a radical shift away

Manufacturers in Alaska, Arizona, California, Connecticut, Hawaii and Vermont face new limits on the use of an employee’s salary history.

The state legislatures in Connecticut and Vermont have both adopted laws banning manufacturers from asking about an applicant’s prior salary.  Those laws are expected to be signed by the Governors of those states and will

The New York State Legislature and New York City Council adopted broad new requirements to combat workplace gender-based harassment. New York State’s new obligations were signed into law on April 12 and take effect at different times over the next 180 days. New York City’s new requirements take effect on April 1, 2019.

New York

Two recent developments, generated from the tidal forces of the #MeToo movement should get manufacturers’ attention.

On December 22, 2017, Congress adopted a comprehensive tax reform law.  Included in the statute is an amended Section 162(q).  That provision states that manufacturers may no longer deduct from federal income tax “(1) any settlement or payment

As has been our tradition, January is the time to predict the big developments in the coming year that will impact manufacturers.  In January 2017, notwithstanding my “Lawyer’s Shrug,” I predicted Congress was unlikely to raise the minimum wage, but states and cities would attempt to do so; the National Labor Relations Board would turn